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Dual Credit: Research Help

Getting Started

The SIFT Test

Make sure you collect quality, reliable sources.

One way to evaluate information is with the SIFT Test.

  • STOP
  • INVESTIGATE the Source
  • FIND Better Coverage
  • TRACE Claims, Quotes, and Media to the Original Context.

Use the SIFT to determine if your source is credible.

Plagiarism Game - Goblin Threat

"How to Research a Paper" video by Howcast

STC Library Research Skills Crash Course

The Research Skills Crash Course is a series of lessons covers information literacy and library research skills that will enable you to use information in a scholarly and ethical way.

CRAAP Test

It is important to evaluate where and what you search and find. One way to do this is to try out the CRAAP test for websites, books, articles, and a range of resources. CRAAP is an acronym for each step of the process of evaluating a source.

  • C: Currency. 
  • RRelevance. 
  • A: Authority. 
  • A: Accuracy. 
  • P: Purpose. 

The CRAAP Test was developed by the Meriam Library at California State University - Chico. September 17, 2010.

How to Evaluate Resources (the CRAAP Test) by McMaster University Library

The timeliness of the information

  • When was the information published or posted?
  • Has the information been revised or updated?
  • Does your topic require current information, or will older sources work as well?
  • Are the links functional?

Another thing to consider - does the website's copyright date match the content's currency?  Or is it just a standard range?

Source: Central Michigan University Libraries

Creative Commons License

Website Research: CRAAP Test by Rebecca Hill Renirie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

The importance of the information
for your needs

  • Does the information relate to your topic or answer your question?
  • Who is the intended audience?
  • Is the information at an appropriate level (i.e. not too elementary or advanced for your needs)?
  • Have you looked at a variety of sources before determining this is one you will use?

Source: Central Michigan University Libraries

Creative Commons License

Website Research: CRAAP Test by Rebecca Hill Renirie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

The source of the information

  • Who is the author/publisher/source/sponsor?
  • What are the author's credentials or organizational affiliations?
  • Is the author qualified to write on the topic?
  • Is there contact information, such as a publisher or email address?
  • Does the URL reveal anything about the author or source?

Note - to help answer Authority and Purpose questions, check out a website's About page.

Source: Central Michigan University Libraries

Creative Commons License

Website Research: CRAAP Test by Rebecca Hill Renirie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

The reliability, truthfulness and correctness of the content

  • Where does the information come from?
  • Is the information supported by evidence?
  • Has the information been reviewed or refereed?
  • Can you verify any of the information in another source or from personal knowledge?
  • Does the language or tone seem unbiased and free of emotion?
  • Are there spelling, grammar or typographical errors?

Source: Central Michigan University Libraries

Creative Commons License

Website Research: CRAAP Test by Rebecca Hill Renirie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

The reason the information exists

  • What is the purpose of the information? Is it to inform, teach, sell, entertain or persuade?
  • Do the authors/sponsors make their intentions or purpose clear?
  • Is the information fact, opinion or propaganda?
  • Does the point of view appear objective and impartial?
  • Are there political, ideological, cultural, religious, institutional or personal biases?

Note - to help answer Authority and Purpose questions, check out a website's About page.

Source: Central Michigan University Libraries

Creative Commons License

Website Research: CRAAP Test by Rebecca Hill Renirie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

STC Research Library Tutorials

Writing and Citing

Need help writing your paper and citing your sources?

Visit Writing & Citing Sources

CLE Website and Online Tutoring

cle websiteOnline Tutoring

Come to the Centers for Learning Excellence (CLE) to receive tutoring, work on homework assignments, meet with study groups, and attend study skills workshops. All services offered through the CLE are free to all enrolled students of South Texas College.

Contact Us

Visit the Hours and Contacts page to see how you can get in touch with a librarian to assist you with your research.

Hours & Contacts